Packera mancosana
Author: Yeatts, B.Schneid. & Al Schneid.


Mancos shale packera


Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Close up of Packera mancosana. Photo İAl Schneider, www.swcoloradowildflowers.com.
Click image to enlarge.

Close up of Packera mancosana inflorescence. Photo İAl Schneider, www.swcoloradowildflowers.com.
Click image to enlarge.

Taxonomic Comments

Discovered by Betty and Al Schneider in 2008 and published in 2011 (Yeatts et al. 2011). Ackerfield (2012) includes this as a synonym under Packera werneriifolia. Packera manosana is distinguished from P. werneriifolia by it's persistently tomentose, gray-green leaves that are not serrate-dentate; and overall, P. mancosana has fewer stems and flower heads per plant (Yeatts et al. 2011, Weber and Wittmann 2012).

Ranks and Status

Global rank: G1
State rank: S1
Federal protection status: None
State protection status: None

[+] Description and Phenology

Packera mancosana by Dorothy DePaulo in progress

General description: Packera mancosana is a rhizomatous, perennial species with a tightly packed growth form and very short stature.  Ray and disc flowers are bright yellow.  Leaves are gray-green, and tomentose-cobwebby.  Basal leaves are very hairy, sometimes toothed or notched. Plants start out with very small clusters of leaves and over the years grow into dense mats up to 30 cm in diameter and 3 cm high.  Flower stems are also quite hairy, 7-10 cm high, have few very short and narrow leaves, and can branch or support but one flower head  (Yeatts et al. 2011, Schneider 2013).

Look Alikes: Packera mancosana is distinguished from P. werneriifolia by it's persistently tomentose, gray-green leaves that are not serrate-dentate; and overall, P. mancosana has fewer stems and flower heads per plant (Yeatts et al. 2011, Weber and Wittmann 2012). Also, Packera werneriifolia is primarily found near and above treeline, occasionally lower (Yeatts et al. 2011).


Phenology: Depending on the arrival of spring, it begins flowering in mid-May, fruiting into July (Yeatts et al. 2011).

[+] Habitat

Habitat of Packera mancosana. Photo İAl Schneider, www.swcoloradowildflowers.com.
Click image to enlarge.

This species is known from outcrops of grayish, argillaceous marine Mancos Shale.  The plants are found on very sparsely vegetated flats (slopes ca. 2%) and sides of shallow washes. They grow along cracks in the bare shale and in thin gravelly soil over the shale.  Packera mancosana is among the more abundant species in this habitat. Associated species include Helianthella microcephala, Physaria pulvinata, Tetraneuris acaulis, Townsendia leptotes, Eriogonum lonchophyllum, Gutierrezia elegans, Petradoria pumila, Astragalus missouriensis var. amphibolus, Heterotheca villosa, Calochortus nuttallii, Delphinium nuttallianum, Orthocarpus purpureoalbus, Packera oodes, and Solidago simplex; Pinus ponderosa with pinyon-juniper on nearby surrounding slopes (Yeatts et al. 2011).

Elevation Range: 7,575 - 7,575 feet (2,309 - 2,309 meters)

[+] Distribution

Distribution of Packera mancosana in Colorado.
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Colorado endemic: Yes
Global range: Known only from Dolores County in southwest Colorado (Yeatts et al. 2011; Colorado Natural Heritage Program 2013).

[+] Threats and Management Issues

This species is found on State Lands, and predominent land uses where the plants grow are hunting and grazing (Colorado Natural Heritage Program 2013).

[+] References

    • Ackerfield, J. 2012. The Flora of Colorado. Draft. Colorado State University Herbarium. 433 pp.
    • Beardsley, M. and D. A. Steingraeber. 2013. Population dynamics, rarity and risk of extirpation for populations of Mimulus gemmiparus (budding monkeyflower) on National Forests of Colorado. A research report submitted to the USFS Forest Service. Arapaho and Roosevelt National Forets and Pawnee National Grassland. pp 17. Accessed online on May 11 at: http://www.r5.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/Rare_Plants/profiles/Critically_Imperiled/mimulus_gemmiparus/ documents/USFS_MimulusStatusReport2013.pdf
    • Colorado Natural Heritage Program. 2013. Biodiversity Tracking and Conservation System (BIOTICS). Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado State University, Fort Collins.
    • Schneider, A. 2013. Wildflowers, Ferns, and Trees of the Four Corners Regions of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, and Utah. Accessed on-line at http://www.swcoloradowildflowers.com.
    • USDA, NRCS. 2013. The PLANTS Database. National Plant Data Team, Greensboro, NC 27401-4901 USA.
    • Weber, W.A., and R.C. Wittmann. 2012b. Colorado Flora, Western Slope, a field guide to the vascular plants, fourth edition. Boulder, Colorado. 532 pp.
    • Yeatts, L., B. Schneider, and A. Schneider. 2011. Packera mancosana (Asteraceae: Senecioneae), a new species and shale barren endemic of southwestern Colorado. Phytoneuron 2011-26: 18.
    • Yeatts, L., B. Schneider, and A. Schneider. 2011. Packera mancosana (Asteraceae: Senecioneae), a new species and shale barren endemic of southwestern Colorado. Phytoneuron 26: 1-8.

Last Updated

2013-07-15